Monthly Archives: July 2014

You Can’t Take It With You – Best Picture Winner; 1938

You Can't Take It With You

The Basics – You Can’t Take It With You (1938) – Director – Frank Capra; starring Jean Arthur, Jimmy Stewart, Lionel Barrymore; Run Time – 126 mins. – Comedy, Romance –  “A man from a family of rich snobs becomes engaged to a woman from a good-natured but decidedly eccentric family.”

Prior Knowledge

Kristy – In order to prepare the food, I had to do a little research on the movie, so I know that it is basically about a collision of worlds between two very different families.

Koob – All I know about this movie is that it is by the great Frank Capra.

Fun Facts

Shortly before filming began, Lionel Barrymore lost the use of his legs to crippling arthritis and a hip injury. To accommodate him, the script was altered so that his character had a sprained ankle, and Barrymore did the film on crutches.

Lionel Barrymore plays Jean Arthur‘s grandfather in the film. In reality, he was only 22 years her senior.

-A 1938 feature film usually ran to 8,000 feet of film. Frank Capra shot 329,000 feet for this one.
-The original play by Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman won the 1937 Pulitzer Prize for Drama. It was still running on Broadway when the film opened.
The first film collaboration of Jean ArthurJames Stewart and Frank Capra. Later the same teamed up for Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939).

Viewing Source – Free streaming video @ http://stagevu.com/video/lchbzzytrcbd

Post Viewing Responses

 

Ratings (with 1 star = the worst and 5 stars = the best)

Koob: 3 stars

Kristy: 4 stars

Double Gobble Score: 3.5 stars

 

The Takeaway: An under-appreciated Frank Capra film that should be recognized by modern audiences for its witty, intelligent comedy and memorable cast of characters.

 

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Garlic-Saffron Seafood Soup w/Instant Ramen for “You Can’t Take It With You”

Garlic-Saffron Soup

Since a critical scene in “You Can’t Take it With You” features a stuffy, rich family and an eccentric, middle-class family coming together for an impromptu dinner party , we decided to do our take on a high-low family dinner combining some high-quality ingredients with some ingredients that are more likely to be found in a college dorm room:

Garlic-Saffrom Seafood Soup w/Instant Ramen – (Serves 2)

Ingredients:

1 bulb of garlic

2 frozen tilapia filets (or another flaky whitefish) – defrost before cooking

6-8 pieces of shrimp

2 packets of Top Ramen instant noodle soup (you will not be using the flavor packets)

1/4 cream of whole milk

1/2 cup of frozen corn

1 quart organic vegetable broth

pinch of saffron

dash of black pepper

Directions:

First roast the bulb of garlic in your oven.

When garlic is fully cooked, pour vegetable broth into a large soup pot and add the saffron.

Bring to a boil.

While broth is cooking, take roasted garlic clove and place in a blender with the cream/milk and liquify.

Once the broth reaches a boil, stir your milk mixture into the pot and bring the heat down to a low-medium temperature.

Place fish and shrimp into pot to cook for approximately three minutes and stir.  The fish will break up into chunks during the stirring process.

Add ramen noodles and corn and let simmer until both corn and noodles are fully cooked (approximately 3-5 minutes).

Sprinkle on the black pepper.

Take off of heat and let cool before serving in a large soup bowl.

Champagne cocktail

The beverage for your high-low meal should be a glass of your favorite brut champagne with a splash of fruit punch.

 

 

 

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A Symphony of Cheeses for “The Life of Emile Zola”

french cheeses

Cheese in all its incarnations is definitely one of Kristy and Koob’s favorite foods, and France is the home of so many delicious cheeses. But with so many different kinds, it can be a bit overwhelming to choose just one. As Charles de Gaulle once famously said of France, “How can you govern a country which has 246 varieties of cheese”.

Emile Zola captured this sentiment in his 1873 novel “Le Ventre de Paris (The Belly of Paris)”. Much of the novel focuses on Les Halles which was the central market of Paris for many years. While the book is a social commentary on the struggles of the working class and the “fattening” of the bourgeoisie, it is also filled with beautifully descriptive passages of the amazing variety of food found at Les Halles; the most well-known of which is the “Cheese Symphony” which is excerpted below:

All around them the cheeses were stinking. On the two shelves at the back of the stall were huge blocks of butter: Brittany butter overflowing its baskets; Normandy butter wrapped in cloth, looking like models of bellies on to which a sculptor had thrown some wet rags; other blocks, already cut into and looking like high rocks full of valleys and crevices. […] But for the most part the cheeses stood in piles on the table. There, next to the one-pound packs of butter, a gigantic cantal was spread on leaves of white beet, as though split by blows from an axe; then came a golden Cheshire cheese, a gruyère like a wheel fallen from some barbarian chariot, some Dutch cheeses suggesting decapitated heads smeared in dried blood and as hard as skulls – which has earned them the name of ‘death’s heads’. A parmesan added its aromatic tang to the thick, dull smell of the others. […] Then came the strong-smelling cheeses: the mont-d’ors, pale yellow, with a mild sugary smell; the troyes, very thick and bruised at the edges, much stronger, smelling like a damp cellar; the camemberts, suggesting high game; the neufchâtels, the limbourgs, the marolles, the pont-l’évèques, each adding its own shrill note in a phrase that was harsh to the point of nausea; […]
A silence fell at the mention of Gavard. They all looked at each other cautiously. As they were all rather short of breath by this time, it was the camembert they could smell. This cheese, with its gamy odour, had overpowered the milder smells of the marolles and the limbourg; its power was remarkable. Every now and then, however, a slight whiff, a flute-like note, came from the parmesan, while the bries came into play with their soft, musty smell, the gentle sound, so to speak, of a damp tambourine. The livarot launched into an overwhelming reprise, and the géromé kept up the symphony with a sustained note.

( The Belly of Paris, by Émile Zola, Oxford University Press, translated by Brian Nelson, 2007, p210-216)

So grab yourself some brie or some roquefort or some camembert (personally, we say the stinkier the better) and enjoy “The Life of Emile Zola” while creating your own cheese symphony.

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The Life of Emile Zola: Best Picture Winner – 1937

zola_1902b

The Basics – The Life of Emile Zola (1937) – Director – William Dieterle; Paul Muni, Gale Sondergaard, Joseph Schildkraut; Run Time – 116 mins. – Biography, Drama – “The biopic of the famous French muckraking writer and his involvement in fighting the injustice of the Dreyfuss Affair.”

Prior Knowledge

Kristy – The only thing I know is that Emile Zola was a well-known French author and activist.

Koob – The only knowledge that I have of this movie was what I read on Wikipedia about Emile Zola; that he was a French writer and that he wrote “J’accuse” and was involved in the Dreyfus Affair

Fun Facts from IMDB

The film was shot in reverse order; Paul Muni grew his own beard for the role, and it was trimmed and darkened as he proceeded to scenes where Zola is younger. His makeup took 3-1/2 hours to apply each morning.

 Studio boss Jack L. Warner, who was himself Jewish, personally ordered that the word “Jew” be removed from all dialogue in this movie, apparently in order not to offend the Nazi regime and hurt business for the film in Germany–this according to Ben Urwand in his controversial 2013 study, ‘The Collaboration: Hollywood’s Pact With Hitler’.
This was the first film to receive 10 Academy Award nominations.

Considered highly contentious in France, the film wasn’t granted a proper release in that country until 1952

Viewing Source – Amazon Instant Video ($2.99 rental)

Post Viewing Responses

Ratings (with 1 star = the worst and 5 stars = the best)

Koob: 2 stars

Kristy: 2 atars

Double Gobble Score: 2 stars

The Takeaway: A fairly standard biopic with some solid acting and an interesting history lesson.

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Don’t Forget to Check Out “About Me”

Hello Double Gobblers!

We just wanted to take the time to point out our “About Double Gobble” section, where you will find a video of Koob and Kristy explaining why they have chosen to start this blog as well as an explaination of the rating system and the story behind the title, “Double Gobble”

You will also find a link to the movie trailer that played at Koob and Kristy’s movie themed wedding a little over a year ago.

Enjoy!

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The Great Ziegfeld – Best Picture Winner; 1936

Great Zeigfeld

The Basics – The Great Ziegfeld (1936) – Director, Robert Z. Leonard; starring William Powell, Myrna Loy, Louise Rainer; Run Time – 176 mins. – Biography, Drama, Musical -“This biography follows the ups and downs of Florenz Ziegfeld, famed producer of extravagant stage revues.”

Prior Knowledge

Kristy – I know of Ziegfled as a legend on Broadway, however, I know nothing about the actual film itself but I’m expecting large musical numbers with fancy, feathered ladies.

Koob – I have heard of the Ziegfled Follies and know that Ziegfeld was a legendary producer on Broadway but know nothing about the actual film.

Fun Facts from IMDB

-The sequence “A Pretty Girl Is Like a Melody” was filmed in two lengthy takes after several weeks of rehearsals and filming (a definite cut is made when moving to a close-up on the singer dressed as Pagliacci, presumably to effect a change of camera position, necessary to start the inexorable move up the huge staircase). It features 180 performers and cost $220,000; 4,300 yards of rayon silk were used for the curtains in the scene.

-Myrna Loy, who received second billing for this film, does not actually appear on screen until 2 hours and 15 minutes into the movie.

-Pat Nixon (then Patricia Ryan), the future wife of Richard Nixon and the First Lady of the United States from 1969 to 1974, makes an uncredited appearance as a Ziegfeld girl.

-A.A. Trimble, who portrays Will Rogers in the film, was actually a Cleveland map salesman who frequently impersonated Rogers at Rotarian lunches.

Viewing Source – Amazon Instant Video ($2.00 rental)

Post Viewing Responses

Ratings (with 1 star = the worst and 5 stars = the best)

Koob: 3 stars

Kristy: 2 stars

Double Gobble Score: 2.5 stars

The Takeaway: Watch for the elaborate recreation of Ziegfeld’s Follies, but make sure you clear your schedule (it’s a long one!).

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Chicago Style Hot Dog and New York Style Hot Dog for “The Great Ziegfeld”

Chicago Dog
New York Dog

In honor of Florenz Ziegfeld who was born in Chicago but was an adopted son of New York City, we decided to put up a poll on two classic variations of the good old-fashioned, all-American hot dog; the Chicago dog or the New York dog.  Which do you prefer?

Chicago Dog Toppings – yellow mustard; chopped white onions; bright green sweet pickle relish; a dill pickle spear; tomato slices or wedges; pickled sport peppers; and a dash of celery salt.

New York Dog Toppings – all-beef Kosher dog with sauerkraut and a smear of mustard

Koob prefers the New York style but Kristy prefers the following:

Kristy’s Veggie Dog – Tofurkey brand veg dog with vegetarian baked beans, ketchup, spicy brown mustard, and relish

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